January 11, 2010

This week: Brush discussion, and turning Patton into the Moon.

First off, for all those concerned, my fingers have healed creepily well, to the point where I have fingerprints back except on a very tiny bit on my thumb, and they're growing in there too. If you want to see what they looked like after one week, click here. Do NOT click if you're squeamish at all. My thumb, which got the deepest cut, is still a tad tender, but they're both up and running with honest-to-God skin. The skin was really dry until the last few days, because my new sebaceous glands hadn't grown in yet. Now I can sweat and produce oil, so it doesn't look like I have crazy localized eczema.

So, there was a lot of conversation about last week's topic and my retraction of my endorsement of Rosemary and co's brushes, and I'd like to discuss and clarify a few things about that, while also rolling in a couple items that Chris Schweiser gave me to review when I was at SCAD Atlanta.

In the comments Kiel provided a link to a fantastic primer/comparison on five different name brand brushes on artist Mike Crowell's site. Mike has, without reservation, the worst artist web page I have ever seen in my life, which is saying a lot, which makes it all the more bizarre that this amazing tutorial is just sitting there amongst the 4 other pages of his site, which include a home page consisting almost solely of a terrible photo of him, an art page with 2 pages of art, a page with nothing but am email address, and a links page. His brush lesson is as good as the rest of the site is bafflingly poor, and I learned some new things from it. It also serves as a great primer for the point I want to make, which is about consistency and/versus quality.

Mike's brush page confirms yet again what I and many others have always said- they don't do it often, but when they do, Windsor and Newton makes the best brushes in the world. But if you just broke/lost/ruined your brush and you need one NOW for a project, you can't afford to go to 3 different stores and try every brush looking for one that works, and possibly not even find one. (This has happened to me- twice.) Everyone I know who doesn't use Windsor and Newton either never used a great one and abandoned them early, or used them for years until the quality control dropped so low they got frustrated and jumped ship. But the fact is, there are people out there still using 20 year old W&N brushes. I've used my #3 like I hated it for 6 years now and it's still as good as new. Windsor and Newton , a GOOD Windor and Newton, is a mythical beast, the brush that all other brushes aspire to be. As a brand, they suck and are FLAKY inconsistent.

Raphael is the brand most people jump ship to, and with good reason. You still need to test them, but their QC is much better than W&N. You can actually find a working Raphael brush in one store stocked with them almost every time. If you ordered five I'd give you great odds more than one would work. And their best brushes are just a hair under a good W&N, which is like being a shade slower than the Millennium Falcon but not breaking down nearly as much.

The reason I was so excited about Rosemary was not that they were amazing quality brushes- they're not. They are perfectly effective, however. A good Rosemary brush is like what I'd picture a solid military issue brush to be like- it lacks finesse, but it's solidly built and in skilled hands will get the job done. Rosemary brushes won't hold as much ink and have less spring than better brushes, but because every single one I and everyone else ordered was a perfect example, I recommended them because she was the most consistent. Rosemary brushes were, I thought, the first brushes I'd ever seen where you could order ONE brush and get a working brush every time, guaranteed.

But now I semi-frequently have reports sent to me of people ordering brushes from her that are a little off. Now, sure, she has a policy that she'll replace anything you're not satisfied with, but the point was, she was a slightly lower quality but still good brush that I was recommending because of their insane consistency. So if she lacks the consistency, and she doesn't have any edge on quality, why the hell not just tell you to rummage through the art store for Raphaels?

So it is on that basis that I retract my endorsement. I say put your effort and money into a higher quality brush. You really do get what you pay for with brushes.

Mike's brush page has a section towards the bottom about identifying quality brushes that's more specific and informative than anything I've ever posted, so you should read that, maybe even print it out and take it with you when shopping. He inspects every bristle, and if you've ever used a brush you know that's not fanatical- one splayed hair will ruin a brush. It's like a grain of sand in a Swiss army knife.

According to Mike Raphael and Scharff brushes are essentially identical in constriction and quality control, so if you need to dash out to buy one they'd both be good choices. I have never heard of ANYONE being disappointed with either. However, because mora brands means more likely hood you'll be able to find a brush if you need to find one fast, allow me to toss in a brand that's only become recently available in America, but which seems to be in growing demand amongst the students at SCAD's Atlanta campus: the Escoda, made in Tajmir, Spain.

Here you can see the #2 Tajmir on top, over my trusty #3 W&N, and my #2 Rosemary. Click to see the image larger.
I wish I had a #2 Windsor to show you how the belly's compare better, but you can see that the Escoda has a better belly than the Rosemary, though not as much as the W&N.
A simple line test showed that indeed, the Escoda holds far more ink than the Rosemary. I wish I could compare it to other brands, but I don't have any. It feels to me slightly wispier but just as springy as the Raphaels I've tried. It's a good brush and several SCAD Atlanta students and faculty seem to just love them. Chris claims the quality control is very good on them. Look for them if you're ever out brush hunting. If nothing else, it's another good option that increases your chances of coming back home with a tool you can draw with. While I was there Chris also gave me a bottle of a new Japanese ink I'd never seen nor heard of that's carried in a local art supply store that caters to the cartooning students. It's called Holbein ink. According to their company profile they started in 1900 a a Japanese company producing "European" artist materials (They do not elaborate), which presumably explains why they chose a German name. Like everything I've ever bought from Japan, the ink bottle comes in nifty, crazy sturdy plastic packaging that you don't have to destroy to open.

Here you can see the Holbein logo in a calligraphic font, with an Iron cross over it, because I guess that's what the Japanese thought people would think was German at the time.
As usual, I LOVE Japanese infographics.
The ink is one of the best I've ever tried, continuing Japan's total dominance in modern ink making. It's matte and deeply black, sort of like Dr. Ph. Martin's Black Star Hi Carb ink. I like this ink a little better. If you can get ahold of it, definitely try it. My understanding is that it comes in two thicknesses, this one, and another that is very thick and actually needs dilution before use.

Changing subjects, remember how I said you'd crap yourselves when you saw what was delaying me? It was Two large poster projects, one of which I can't show you just yet, but the other of which is finished, and I'll share it's making with you below.

First off, some of you may recall a ways back last year when Patton Oswalt had me do this poster for a show of his:


Well, he liked that one so much had asked me to design the postcard for another show.

I needed a fairly simple design that would read easily at a small size, and something that would force people to look at it, which as every artist knows means face, eyes, hands, boobs or any nudity. Patton has a fantastically expresive and distinctive face (He's one of the comedians who I think almost all of his fans know what he looks like), so I decided to go with his face. Plus, I already knew how to draw him, so that would save time.

You can now follow along with my process by matching the numbered paragraphs to their matching numbered picture:


1: This was my first doodle of what would turn out to e the final composition, although I did more than 30 other drawings to make sure, as is usual with me on illustrations. Illustrations aren't as intuitive for me as comics, and require a lot of planning. I throw away a lot of work doing illustrations. Obviously, the concept is to have his head be the moon from "La Voyage Dans La Lune." The twist is that the rocket in his eye is actually the LCross rocket stage that was launched at the moon to look for water. It took me 3 hours to find 6 good, accurate images of this goddamned thing:
The probe is the gold thing on the top.

2: This was a computer sketch I did to establish the basic lettering shapes in the title, which was to be hand-lettered, and of the overall image. I like using digital when I have to do a lot of drafts to figure out black balance but not necessarily a lot of redrawing.
3: I penciled his face and then found myself stuck for about 2 days as to how the hell to make him look like his head was the moon without making him look like he had a terrible skin condition. Nothing was working. I got really frustrated with the delay when Patton wrote me asking if it was done so he could post it for New Years and I had to tell him no.

4: Finally, I figured it out and successfully tested it it on the computer: instead of making his head the moon, I'd do what the original filmmakers had done- apply the moon like a mast around his head, with his head sliiiiiightly pushing out from the moon, so you can still barely still see his original jaw line, but then stretching his hairline and ears out to the edges of the moon. It worked perfectly- still recognizably Patton, but looking like the moon from the film.

5: Next came the pencils, for the drawing, border, and hand lettering.

6: Then came the inked lettering, which you see me holding here for scale:


Hand lettering is generally drawn large when a very smooth finished product is needed; reduction eliminates any mistakes. I also added in the rest of the lettering, a tedious process, because I wasn't using a computer font, but rather an old font that I'd scanned in and modified slightly. I had to place each and every letter by hand.

My girlfriend swooped in and gave me some help with this- she is absolutely excellent at spacing type, and her adjustments made all the difference in the world.

I emailed Patton about whether his current hairstyle matched the one I used in this drawing, but he never wrote back. As it turned out I didn't need him for that one, because that very night he was on the Tonight show, and I was able to see his hair there and adjust my drawing accordingly. (I ended up making is a mishmosh of about 4 similar hairstyles like his current one, figuring it would be more recognizable to average them.)

I had an incredibly odd moment inking the drawing. I was getting fristrated drawing the Lcross booster and I decided to move in to his face for a bit to relax (I like to eat my veggies before my meat, so to speak), and as soon as I started inking his eyebrows Patton called in live to the Best Show on WFMU, which I was listening to, so suddenly I was getting Patton through the eyes and in the ears at the same time. My night suddenly became a Russian Nesting doll of Patton. I tried emailing him to see if I could get him to talk about how I was listening to him and drawing him at the same time while he was still on the air, but he didn't get it till after. It was worth a shot.

It had been awhile since I inked anything, and in my rustiness I over-inked the left side of Patton's face, requiring me to lightbox that side and re-ink it, as you can see here: 7: I drew the border with a thick bamboo skewer and then inverted the image in photoshop.

8: And voila, the finished product, which you can see better below: (Click to enlarge)
I'm pretty damned proud of it. It's by far my best lettering job, and I love the composition.

I look forward to when I can show you the other poster I've been working on. It's still in development right now.

Finally, I thought you all might like this funny shot of me looking out of the eye window in my camera mask, which allows me to look at things for real and not just through the camera's rear screen. Next week: My visit to SCAD

17 comments:

Sckraps said...

Good to see the fingers are back in working (if not a little zombie movie looking) order!

Thanks for that little bit about the Escoda brushes and Holbein ink. I remembered hearing Holbein a few times in past conversations with other artists, but never really dug any deeper.

After reading your brush portion of the post, I've tossed my Rosemary catalog out. I was - just - about to pick up a couple and start playing that game of roulette, but got cold feet after the previous comment sections cast that gloomy cloud. Albeit a completely helpful cloud...

Congrats on the Patton postcard! I must say you hit a much more sharpened likeness in this current one. Very well done!

Rivkah said...

Sckraps:

I have to say Matt and I have been having disagreements about the Rosemary brushes. I was in your same position about six months ago: didn't have a lot of money to spend but wanted to try a LOT of different kinds of brushes to figure out exactly what sizes and shapes I might like in a brush. For twenty-five bucks, I got five different sized kolinsky series 33 brushes and a watercolor brush. The watercolor brush was decent, but the kolinsky brushes changed what had previously been a firm hatred of brush into a lusty love affair. I f*cking LOVE brush now.

Unlike Matt, I haven't used a lot of brushes, so I don't personally know how W&N and Raphael brushes compare, but the complaints I've read about them seem pretty minor things when your just starting out and trying to figure out how a brush actually works. If it doesn't hold as much ink, you'll just have to dip more. And I've never had a problem getting a point or a thick line, or of them splitting except under the greatest pressure. Usually I just get sort of a drybrush look when I apply a lot of pressure.

I still think that Rosemary brushes are an excellent brush for their price, and as I was just saying to Matt: they're the sort of brush you want to get a lot of just to see how a brush feels. They may not make artists cream their pants like apparently a good W&N does, but they seem like a good start to me.

Plus, once you figure out what size you like best (like how I figured how drastically different a 5 is from a 2, and that I really prefer a 5, which I though I'd prefer the thinner brush!), you can always go out and buy a nicer one in another brand.

As for me? I don't want to spend $10-$20 on a single brush just to test it out and possibly never use it again! Some of the rosemary's I bought sit unused (like the 0), but I spent less than $5 on it, so I really don't mind.

Seriously, for twenty or thirty bucks, you should try a selection and see what you think. I love mine, and I love the faith they've given me in brush again that had been destroyed by a BAD WINDSOR AND NEWTON.

So there. (sticks tongue out at Matt)

matt said...

You can see why I love this woman, right?

Melisa Des Rosiers said...

The Patton Poster is fantastic. Thanks for sharing! Also, the brush comparison, as always, is extremely useful. I'm keeping mad mental notes on your suggestions the next time I'm at the art store.

Sckraps said...

Thanks for that insight Rivkah! I work at an educational/art supply store, and we had a coupon that cut me a nice deal on a series 7 WN, a size 2.

I couldn't resist after seeing that our display model hadn't succumbed to the "Let's open it up, take the cap off, replace the cap with bristles caught pointing down" fate that most of our nicer brushes fell victim to. No one's fault but the fact that no one really buys our WN's. We actually didn't even know if the key was the right one to open the case....

Anyways, long rambling comment short...I can feel such a solid difference when I push for a slimmer line. I'm shaky at best, but it's totally an improvement in feel over, say, my generic brand squirrel hair #4. It's nice to have something tangible you can feel when using a better brush.

Rosemary's not out, although my catalog is gone I did order a couple cat's tongues, because I simply cannot find them here, at least not unless I want something made out of plastic....

sckraps said...

Looks like Blick's carries the Escoda brushes. http://bit.ly/62wDXe

Although I loathe that company for making me pay full MSRP in-store and not honoring any online ads, even their own, it's nice to know they've usually got a good stock on just about everything....I might play ball with them for a size 3 or 4.

Agentflit said...

Hot damn, Matt. Shit's cash.

westival said...

I agree with Rivkah for the most part.

Truth be told, I'm not even completely sold on the "Ohmigod Kolinsky Sableeee"

If you're a beginner, I would say a kolinsky is going to feel way too supple for hands that are used to scraping a rolling ball across the page.

I just did a 6 page comic with Rosemary's Red Sable/Synthetic blend. It kicked ass as far as I'm concerned.

westival said...

That brings up a larger point when considering your tools of choice: Ultimately, the RESULTS on the page should be the determining factor. A close second is the FUNness. A tool should be fun to use, and give you the results you desire. The top-rated finalists after a series of empiracal tests will not necessarily fit that criteria.

Anton Emdin said...

Well said, Westival. I agree totally.

And it is also what you are used to as well. And sometimes it is a comfort factor. If you are at the drawing board for hours on end, every day, sometimes using a stiffer brush reduces fatigue on the hand. I've also started using a fude or dip pen in parts to help with this, too.

westival said...

It's funny, when I go back and read my comments, I sound like someone who has a lot of working experience. In reality I am an amateur's amateur.

Please take what I say with 3 grains of salt and a star anise, friends.

MichalClark said...

Indeed, even if you have no interest in comics at all, this charming book will win a place in your life because ultimately it is about communication and stories -- and those are the foundations of all cultures. Making Comics teaches you the visual elements of stories. If I had to re-title it, I would call this book Making Visual Stories.

Finally, as an example of communication itself, this comic book has few peers. I read, review and use hundreds of how-to books every year. I can't think of any instructional manual in any subject that is clearer, more thorough, more honest, more user friendly than Making Comics.


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cara menambah tinggi badan said...

Raphael is the brand most people jump ship to, and with good reason. You still need to test them, but their QC is much better than W&N. You can actually find a working Raphael brush in one store stocked with them almost every time. If you ordered five I'd give you great odds more than one would work. And their best brushes are just a hair under a good W&N, which is like being a shade slower than the Millennium Falcon but not breaking down nearly as much.

cara meninggikan badan said...

Everyone I know who doesn't use Windsor and Newton either never used a great one and abandoned them early, or used them for years until the quality control dropped so low they got frustrated and jumped ship. But the fact is, there are people out there still using 20 year old W&N brushes. I've used my #3 like I hated it for 6 years now and it's still as good as new. Windsor and Newton , a GOOD Windor and Newton, is a mythical beast, the brush that all other brushes aspire to be. As a brand, they suck and are FLAKY inconsistent.

uruha said...

until the quality control dropped so low they got frustrated and jumped ship. But the fact is, there are people out there still using 20 year old W&N brushes. I've used my #3 like I hated it for 6 years now and it's still as good as new. Windsor and Newton , a GOOD Windor and Newton, is a mythical beast, the brush that all other brushes aspire to be. As a brand, they suck and are FLAKY inconsistent.
tinggi badan

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